a few film directors who influence me…

…..and some thoughts from their philosophical approaches to their art–not the only ones btw, just ones who stand out career-wise:

David Cronenberg:

Everybody’s a mad scientist, and life is their lab. We’re all trying to experiment to find a way to live, to solve problems, to fend off madness and chaos.
Censors tend to do what only psychotics do: they confuse reality with illusion.
I see technology as being an extension of the human body.
Sex is a doorway to something so powerful and mystical, but movies usually depict it in a completely flat way.
My cow is not pretty, but it is pretty to me.
You’re right on the money with that. We’re all like detectives in life. There’s something at the end of the trail that we’re all looking for.
I really, sincerely believe that one should trust the work, and not the author.
I have often thought it was very arrogant to suppose you could make a film for anybody but yourself.
I am certain that there are two things in life which are dependable, the delights of the flesh and the delights of literature.
Last but not least, Catherine Breillat (name drop moment: I met Catherine Breillat in the early 2000s at European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switerland–she taught a class on her film work to a class that included a small but very angry set of young, privileged white American men who spent their time trolling her instead of gaining insight on how she produced her work):
…the basic theme is the dichotomy of womanhood. the woman cut in two. every society creates laws to exercise power over women and exclude certain parts of the woman…
If I haven’t found out who I am until the end of my life…because I am afraid/ashamed of it, then I would have just pretended to live. Intimacy really means to find something out about yourself that is deep inside.
I am eternally, devastatingly romantic, and I thought people would see it because ‘romantic’ doesn’t mean ‘sugary.’ It’s dark and tormented — the furor of passion, the despair of an idealism that you can’t attain.

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Oops for May 2019

My 30 day writing stunt was a bust–grades, meetings, and health got in the way. So I will relaunch in June for 2019, and I will start off with a couple of podcasts, one of which will be focused on poetry coming from me and a guest who has a poetic voice not often heard or seen.  My tongue is still healing but it’s no longer as swollen, thank you very much. The bruise on my thigh is fading quickly.  No, not healing from bike riding issue–just gave away my bike–just a fainting spell from perimenopause.

Yeah…….ever kind of feel like this is the now, as in now is the time to get your best work out there, to do your best while you can still do it, while your mind, spirit, and body are still allowing you to say it do it be it in that moment or those moments? This is what 50-something feels like to me. Time to get those books floating in my head out of me, those brilliant crazy courses planned out and launched, dreams becoming reality. So I keep running into these essays about people losing it, getting it back, etc.etc., and I’m like, what the fuck am I waiting for?

So……some may say I skipped the motherhood part from maiden and went straight to crone, but I say I am a Mother in my classroom and to the collective. I could say that I am not quite ready to say I am crone for a couple of reasons, but then again, could it be that one can be maid, lover, mother, and crone in one space? Sometimes we occupy these roles as needed. Some of us didn’t become mothers for whatever reason–our magick remains potent, our poetry far reaching.

Watch this space in June.  Support my brand:  https://cash.app/$drcat

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Performing Black Womanhood

Black Womanhood Flyer

Performing Black Womanhood

Saturday March 2nd, 10am

Hispanic Reading Room (LJ-240), Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St., S.E., Washington, D.C.

‘Performing Black Womanhood’ celebrates the intellectual and artistic lives of women across the African diaspora.

The event includes a pop-up exhibit of materials from the Special and General collections curated by Hispanic Division staff and Arts and Humanities Research Council Fellow, Adjoa Osei, as well as a Research Orientation focusing on women in the arts from Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Iberian Peninsula.  The morning concludes with a Symposium featuring a panel of speakers who will deliver presentations that will explore and celebrate women of color in the arts.

Pop-up exhibit: 10am – 2pm

Research orientation: 10:30am – 11:15 am

Symposium: 11:30am-1pm

Adjoa Osei, University of Liverpool

Lá vem a baiana – Performing an Afro-Brazilian Archetype’

Dr. Camara Dia Holloway, independent scholar:

‘Dark Beauty, Bright Ambition: Navigating Black Stardom in Jazz Age NY/LON’

Sala Elise Patterson, independent scholar

‘Finding Ady: Recovering the Story of a Black Surrealist Muse’

At the Edge Think Culture is Knowledge, Production, Performative, Liminality!

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At the Edge discusses ideas, crossing cultural boundaries to expand ideas about art, writing, knowledge, publishing, and production, while contending with challenges about access, virtual space, political context/challenges, and incursion of cyber cultures.


Help me keep my podcast going strong this season!

SHOW PAGE

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture

PODCAST LINK

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/podcast

SEASON TWO 2018-2019

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2019/01/05/adapting-the-interpersonal-reducing-gun-violence-in-black-communities

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/13/soulful-visions-of-the-speaking-self-ronald-mason

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/05/amanda-huron–carving-out-the-commons

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/06/22/culture-makers-ronald-mason-and-spoken-word

Merry Christmas!

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Season’s Greetings readers and listeners! Merry Christmas!

I’ll be adding some poetry to my blog over the brief break. More podcasts are coming for 2019, but for now please download my latest podcast here:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/13/soulful-visions-of-the-speaking-self-ronald-mason

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Here’s my first 2018 episode featuring Ronald Mason:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/06/22/culture-makers-ronald-mason-and-spoken-word

Also, do check out my talk with Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/05/amanda-huron–carving-out-the-commons

Pick up Amanda’s book here:

https://www.amazon.com/Carving-Out-Commons-Organizing-Cooperatives-ebook/dp/B07B46FS9H/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1544020183&sr=1-1&keywords=amanda+huron

Support my website and podcast here –> cash.me/$drcat

My first book is still available too: https://mellenpress.com/book/How-Three-Black-Women-Writers-Combined-Spiritual-and-Sensual-Love-Rhetorically-Transcending-the-Boundaries-of-Language-Audre-Lorde-Toni-Morrison-and-Dionne-Brand/7973/

I am currently at work on my second book!

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Safe travels, and hugs/kisses for all my readers and listeners!

A word of wisdom from a literary ancestor I met briefly during grad school

“For the poet, the world is word. Words. Not that precisely. Precisely: the world and words fuck each other.”
― Kathy Acker

It was my first conference, my first time presenting a paper at an academic conference, and my first time in California. San Diego was almost overwhelming to my senses, but upon listening to this heavily tattooed woman with face piercings, electric blue leggings, and short blond hair, I began the process of understanding why I was drawn to Henry Miller, Anais Nin, and Erica Jong–and ultimately Audre Lorde, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison.

I love Kathy Acker, God rest her beautiful, subversive soul and her penchant for being so raw, so fierce, so raunchy, and so unafraid of putting it out there for us to see. It was my first time meeting and listening to a writer who showed me how to embrace my own penchant for not giving a fuck about what people think about me writing about erotic subjectivity or writing about desire.  Imagine that, given the assumptions about religious, racial, and social class similarities and differences regarding women in America.

If you are reading this, go click on my podcast with Ronald Mason–I didn’t mention all of these writers during our podcast talk, but the ghosts of Nin, Miller, and Lorde were in the room and on the phone as we spoke. I think I’ve been holding back, a bit of a wound that has not healed from the trauma of grad school and worsened in the business of academia. Mason and I did talk on that a bit. He gets it as a writer as well as an administrator in academia.

And no, it is not an accident that my confidence as a literary scholar and as a creative writer revived itself when he came to UDC in 2015–sometimes a change in leadership from mundane and normalized misogynoir in academia can liberate the marginalized from the corners, even it wasn’t necessarily intentional. A pause so to speak, so that one’s passion for the word can flourish. He called me a scholar in a previous podcast I posted this summer–something I don’t hear often from colleagues.

To be Black and female in academia (even at a so-called HBCU) is to be constantly challenged as to whether one is truly a scholar, or even someone who is qualified to teach. Unlike the previous leaders at UDC, this man who is our leader actually calls me Dr. Turpin and means it. In this political climate that’s worth mentioning more than once–and bookmarking as a reminder every single time a cloud of worry or anxiety about my worth as a writer emerges.

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Watch the tide


This is the wane of the full moon
the time to toss to the sea
that which must be discarded
that which no longer serves you
that which no longer comforts you
she or he who is toxic to the spirit
now banished from sight
such is life
these are people you forget exist
revert to distant strangers
cast into the sea
burn the letters
wipe away all paths to you
burn the sage
salt down the steps
arise renewed
I am released.