From President Mason!

A special message from President Mason on March 27, 2020

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCQmYMy4NPA

Stay strong, safe, and healthy, UDC Family!

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Free Research Access from @ProjectMUSE

Greg Britton @gmbritton

“To make remote instruction easier right now, @ProjectMUSE

is making access to all @JHUPress books and journals—and those of several other presses– free for the next few months. Students can access from home.”
#KeepTeaching
@insidehighered
 
@ProjectMUSE
“With many of us secluded and/or isolated, scholarly content is still within reach. Special thanks to our participating publishers for providing temporarily FREE content on the MUSE platform.”
 

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‘We Were the Undeserving Throngs’

From Chronicle Review:

Being a Black Academic in America

In the wake of the scandal, The Chronicle Review asked graduate students, junior professors, and senior scholars what it’s like to be an African-American academic today.

“The first thing I learned at college was that as a black student I had ruined college for everyone else.”  Read more here.

I’ll be back in a future post to talk about my experiences from grad school in New England to mid-career at an HBCU in the midst of many micro and macro aggressions along the way.

Comment and discuss below.

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Writing for the Web: Digital Humanities Class – I did my class live today on my podcast channel!

Writing for the Web: Digital Humanities Class – I did my class live today on my podcast channel!

Writing for the Web: Digital Humanities Class

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2019/01/25/writing-for-the-web-digital-humanities-class

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Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons – BlogTalk Radio Interview Today

My show will start at 4:30 today with Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/05/amanda-huron–carving-out-the-commons

Provoked by mass evictions and the onset of gentrification in the 1970s, tenants in Washington, D.C. began forming cooperative organizations to collectively purchase and manage their apartment buildings. These tenants were creating a commons, taking a resource—housing—that had been used to extract profit from them, and reshaping it as a resource that was collectively owned and governed by them. In Carving Out the Commons, Amanda Huron theorizes the practice of urban commoning through a close investigation of the city’s limited-equity housing cooperatives. Drawing on feminist and anticapitalist perspectives, Huron asks whether a commons can work in a city where land and other resources are scarce, and how strangers who may not share a past or future come together to create and maintain commonly-held spaces in the midst of capitalism. Arguing against the romanticization of the commons, she instead positions the urban commons as a pragmatic practice. Through the practice of commoning, she contends, we can learn to build communities to challenge capitalism’s totalizing claims over life.

Author Bio

Amanda Huron is an associate professor of interdisciplinary social sciences at the University of the District of Columbia, in Washington, D.C. She is an urban geographer with a particular interest in housing, gentrification, the decommodification of land, and the history of Washington, D.C. Amanda serves on the board of Empower D.C., a citywide community organizing group that works to empower low- and moderate-income District residents, with a particular focus on anti-displacement work. She is a native of Washington, D.C.’s Ward One.

Buy Dr. Huron’s book at Amazon