This is also rape culture.

Some of my colleagues are seeking insight as to how to respond to January 6.

Start with what was obvious to me as a Black woman who has survived 54 years of rape, domestic abuse, sexual harassment, physical and emotional abuse, bullying, and microaggressions: these men have collective rapist tendencies [for colored girls]. And to be honest, I’ve been on edge in my own apt building and neighborhood this whole year–especially now. Right now, as a Black woman, I don’t feel safe in Washington, DC, but when did I ever feel safe as an adult woman? Especially in DC. DC has always been a safe space for sexual predators, especially those who target Black and Brown women, girls, and femmes and poor women, girls, and femmes of all colors.

UDC’s silence on gender, race, class, and sexual orientation is echoing in the new year, especially as we struggle to persuade students to return to an HBCU trying to alienate poor Black and Brown students in order to reinforce the notion that the ideal higher education student, faculty, administrator, and ultimately citizen is a white upper-class man. I can’t find a single leader at UDC willing to call that coup attempt the criminal action that it was because they will alienate white men who believe themselves entitled to female/femme bodies, especially those female/femme bodies that are Black or Brown. And since I’m getting that kind of energy from my own colleagues, I need to say something out of human decency.

To me, those men on the Hill looked like a bunch of freaks hyped up on video games, meth, and gang-rape videos. Are we really going to fold back onto ourselves in the lockstep of black respectability political ideals as a source of comfort in the face of such evil and then expect young Black and Brown people to trust us?

Take a look at the landscape below and you tell me, Ron, what you see and hear:

This is also rape culture. I have much to say about the intersections of issues and contexts….more to talk about as this case unfolds.

State subsidised companies are exploiting feminism for profit and we’re all watching

A go-to essay that must be shared:

“Neoliberal capitalism, which is built on the disenfranchisement of women and people of colour, is attempting to contain radical discourse within its walls. In doing so it neutralises the potential for system change. Richard Branson, the billionaire businessperson who owns Virgin, is flourishing under the current system. Though he likes to cultivate a benevolent image, he isn’t doing anything that would seriously challenge the system out of which he does so well. It’s far better and easier for him to give the impression that he cares while making symbolic tweaks to unequal structures.

This is going on all around us; it’s how capitalism stayed relatively steady on its feet after the 2008 financial crash. It’s a dangerous process that inhibits the possibility for real change: it takes in the collective effort of intersectional feminism and spits out individualistic gender equality and antiracism in its most feeble form.”

Media Diversified

by Maya Goodfellow

Last week while flicking through TV channels an advert caught my attention. I was momentarily pleased to watch as a young girl was enchanted by clips of famous women – from feminist activist Emmeline Pankhurst to iconic singer Billie Holiday – while Fleur East’s version of Girl on Fire played in the background. But as the feature came to a close, I was jolted back into reality; this was an advert, a multimillion-pound advert for Virgin Media, to be precise. The billion pound conglomerate is now using women and girls to sell broadband. Exploiting feminism for profit.

I can’t celebrate seeing feminism exploited in the ad breaks by a company that has been built by taking millions from the taxpayer. Virgin ushers publicly run assets into the private sector then languishes on subsidies from the public purse while making a huge profit. This is not an outlandish…

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American Nightmare

After reading Kevin P. Keating’scleveland-visitor-bureau post in Salon.com, “Cleveland’s Heart of Darkness,” I felt a need to respond to his description of racism and classism in my hometown:

I lived it everyday in suburbia.

I faced it everyday, as did my parents, brother, and most of my relatives. My parents thought moving to Bedford Heights would protect us from the ills that plague our culture–it was there in suburbia–just hidden under euphemisms.

This latest incident in Cleveland comes as no surprise–but through it all, the people still come together even when the rich and privileged don’t care. Notice I didn’t say that this was about race. Race is only one part here–SOCIAL CLASS has ALWAYS been the measurement by which the institutions and those running them have dispersed services and care in most cities. You see just as many if not more poor Whites getting ill-treatment as Blacks and Hispanics. We just tend to be locked up at higher rates.

To be poor is to be invisible in this country. That, to me, is part of the horror story unfolding in my hometown.

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