From President Mason!

A special message from President Mason on March 27, 2020

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LCQmYMy4NPA

Stay strong, safe, and healthy, UDC Family!

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I’m still here, gimme a hot min

So yeah, I’m on lock-down like the rest of you.

But that  does not mean you get shitty poetry/whinny posts from me.

I’m cooking up some nice, spicy words that can spin possibilities.

Dreams of what’s life like post self-distance.

So much I write about is about intimacy.

What can I do to bring you into my space, spiritually?

Stay tuned.

Stay safe and healthy.

Virtual Hug

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Dr. Cherie Ann Turpin, 2/2020

Liberation of Love

A message to you at 3 am

Don’t let fear or social convention keep you from feeling or expressing love.

Now is the time for the truth.

We all face transitioning at some point in our existence, and as painful as it feels typing this, there is freedom in knowing that we free ourselves when we know, feel, express, and accept love.

I love you.

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How to not get sick or get everybody else sick

My mother’s been on my ass about stocking up on food and water for months, and predicted this pandemic years ago.  I’m using a bit of her common sense from childhood to state the obvious in the face of a nasty virus hitting the streets.

Wash your hands before you touch your genitalia and after you touch your genitalia. Stop picking your nose, and stop ignoring when others do it. Wash your hands or wear gloves everywhere. Wash your hands as soon as you get home, get to work, where ever.  Cook your own food and avoid large crowds.  Cancel your vacation or business trip.  Stock up on food and water.  Work online and minimize your face to face work settings and public transportation.

Wash your nasty hands, fool.

‘We Were the Undeserving Throngs’

From Chronicle Review:

Being a Black Academic in America

In the wake of the scandal, The Chronicle Review asked graduate students, junior professors, and senior scholars what it’s like to be an African-American academic today.

“The first thing I learned at college was that as a black student I had ruined college for everyone else.”  Read more here.

I’ll be back in a future post to talk about my experiences from grad school in New England to mid-career at an HBCU in the midst of many micro and macro aggressions along the way.

Comment and discuss below.

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Updates on my social media spots!

Take a look at my profile updates on ALL my social media sites–check out my profile and my bio for links.

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Dr. Cherie Ann Turpin, 2/2020