a few film directors who influence me…

…..and some thoughts from their philosophical approaches to their art–not the only ones btw, just ones who stand out career-wise:

David Cronenberg:

Everybody’s a mad scientist, and life is their lab. We’re all trying to experiment to find a way to live, to solve problems, to fend off madness and chaos.
Censors tend to do what only psychotics do: they confuse reality with illusion.
I see technology as being an extension of the human body.
Sex is a doorway to something so powerful and mystical, but movies usually depict it in a completely flat way.
My cow is not pretty, but it is pretty to me.
You’re right on the money with that. We’re all like detectives in life. There’s something at the end of the trail that we’re all looking for.
I really, sincerely believe that one should trust the work, and not the author.
I have often thought it was very arrogant to suppose you could make a film for anybody but yourself.
I am certain that there are two things in life which are dependable, the delights of the flesh and the delights of literature.
Last but not least, Catherine Breillat (name drop moment: I met Catherine Breillat in the early 2000s at European Graduate School in Saas-Fee, Switerland–she taught a class on her film work to a class that included a small but very angry set of young, privileged white American men who spent their time trolling her instead of gaining insight on how she produced her work):
…the basic theme is the dichotomy of womanhood. the woman cut in two. every society creates laws to exercise power over women and exclude certain parts of the woman…
If I haven’t found out who I am until the end of my life…because I am afraid/ashamed of it, then I would have just pretended to live. Intimacy really means to find something out about yourself that is deep inside.
I am eternally, devastatingly romantic, and I thought people would see it because ‘romantic’ doesn’t mean ‘sugary.’ It’s dark and tormented — the furor of passion, the despair of an idealism that you can’t attain.

close up photo of camera lens

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Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons – BlogTalk Radio Interview Today

My show will start at 4:30 today with Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/05/amanda-huron–carving-out-the-commons

Provoked by mass evictions and the onset of gentrification in the 1970s, tenants in Washington, D.C. began forming cooperative organizations to collectively purchase and manage their apartment buildings. These tenants were creating a commons, taking a resource—housing—that had been used to extract profit from them, and reshaping it as a resource that was collectively owned and governed by them. In Carving Out the Commons, Amanda Huron theorizes the practice of urban commoning through a close investigation of the city’s limited-equity housing cooperatives. Drawing on feminist and anticapitalist perspectives, Huron asks whether a commons can work in a city where land and other resources are scarce, and how strangers who may not share a past or future come together to create and maintain commonly-held spaces in the midst of capitalism. Arguing against the romanticization of the commons, she instead positions the urban commons as a pragmatic practice. Through the practice of commoning, she contends, we can learn to build communities to challenge capitalism’s totalizing claims over life.

Author Bio

Amanda Huron is an associate professor of interdisciplinary social sciences at the University of the District of Columbia, in Washington, D.C. She is an urban geographer with a particular interest in housing, gentrification, the decommodification of land, and the history of Washington, D.C. Amanda serves on the board of Empower D.C., a citywide community organizing group that works to empower low- and moderate-income District residents, with a particular focus on anti-displacement work. She is a native of Washington, D.C.’s Ward One.

Buy Dr. Huron’s book at Amazon

At the Edge: Tzynya L. Pinchback, Poet and Visionary 08/08 – call in at 8 PM EST!

At the Edge: Tzynya L. Pinchback, Poet and Visionary 08/08 by At the Edge An Afrofuturist Salon | Blog Talk Radio.

 

Call in to speak with the host at (347) 215-7908!

This episode Dr. Cherie Ann Turpin interviews Poet Tzynya Pinchback, who is a “mother, writer, spinster and cranberry enthusiast.  Using narrative as shaman, lyric as landscape, [she is] a corporate proposal writer by day, syllable wench courting meter, form and tambourine-carrying skeletons by night. Tzynya is founder and facilitator of Cat in the Belly – a memoir and guided journaling workshop incorporating eco-psychology and art therapy principles.”  Her work can be seen in Plain View Press’s Alternatives to Surrender anthology;  Paul Politis’ photography exhibit A Clean Well Lighted Place; and Holly Rose Review. She has also authored three poetry chapbooks: EveSongs (1996, University of New Mexico Africana Studies),   hussy (2010), and Pink Confetti (2012). – from TzynyaPinchback.com