LITERATURE: Samuel Delany and the Past and Future of Science Fiction | Neo-Griot

LITERATURE: Samuel Delany and the Past and Future of Science Fiction | Neo-Griot.

From the beginning, Delany, in his fiction, has pushed across the traditional boundaries of science fiction, embraced the other, and questioned received ideas about sex and intimacy.

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Samuel Delaney & Other Sci-Fi Authors Talk Feminism and Genre Writing in New HeForShe Video | Dark Matters

Samuel Delaney & Other Sci-Fi Authors Talk Feminism and Genre Writing in New HeForShe Video | Dark Matters.

“Here are Samuel R. Delany, Joe Haldeman, Simon R. Green, Ian R. MacLeod, Ian McDonald and Todd McCaffrey singing the praises of female sci fi greats like Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia E. Butler, and Andre Norton.”  at http://www.themarysue.com/heforshe-scifi/

Oya – Rise of the Orisa – African Superhero Movie – from AFROPUNK

Oya – Rise of the Orisa – African Superhero Movie – AFROPUNK.

This is why I love AfroPunk!

‘Crumbs’ – The First Ever Ethiopian Post-Apocalyptic, Sur | From “Shadow and Act

‘Crumbs’ – The First Ever Ethiopian Post-Apocalyptic, Sur | Shadow and Act. “Directed by Spaniard Llansó, who actually

lives in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), “Crumbs” stars Daniel Tadesse, and

tells a story of diminutive superhero Gagano (played by Tadesse), a junk collector, who embarks on a “surreal epic

journey”  that’s set against “post-apocalyptic Ethiopian landscapes,” says the press description.”

By Tambay A. Obenson | Shadow and Act

 

Afro-futurism Scholar 2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for my blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 3,600 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 60 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

“Fractal Hant” #30 by Cherie Ann Turpin (30 Stories in 30 Day) #30Days

“Fractal Hant” #30

by Cherie Ann Turpin

(30 Stories in 30 Day)

#30Days
coppersulfate
You find a strange blue crystal on your driveway one evening while picking up the newspaper.  You take it inside and placed it in a glass of warm water, thinking it to be a nice stone to use in your endless collection of homemade jewelry sitting in your bedroom.  It sits on your window shelf over the kitchen sink for about five days, upon which you, after forgetting its existence, glance up at the glass while washing dishes.   You almost jump back at what you see.

Two crystals now occupy the glass, and two others are now sitting on the shelf.  You pick up the glass, and, using paper towels, scoop up the other crystals, panicking at what seems to be an impossibility.  Each crystal is equal in size and each one now seems to cast a reddish hue when close to each other.  You dump it all into a small plastic bag, including the glass of water.  You dump it all into the green garbage container you’ve already rolled out to the curb for the early morning garbage guys.  It takes four men to lift the garbage container into the truck to dump out the trash.

Kneeling on your couch cushions, you peek through your living room curtains to see them step back at the container’s contents mixing with the neighborhood’s trash:  dozens and dozens of crystals that seem to glow like fireflies.  You close the curtain and slowly stand up, as you turn around to see something you don’t want to see:  a single crystal sitting in the middle of your living room carpet, turning red, then black as it levitates up to the height of your face.

Turn around.

And run.