State subsidised companies are exploiting feminism for profit and we’re all watching

A go-to essay that must be shared:

“Neoliberal capitalism, which is built on the disenfranchisement of women and people of colour, is attempting to contain radical discourse within its walls. In doing so it neutralises the potential for system change. Richard Branson, the billionaire businessperson who owns Virgin, is flourishing under the current system. Though he likes to cultivate a benevolent image, he isn’t doing anything that would seriously challenge the system out of which he does so well. It’s far better and easier for him to give the impression that he cares while making symbolic tweaks to unequal structures.

This is going on all around us; it’s how capitalism stayed relatively steady on its feet after the 2008 financial crash. It’s a dangerous process that inhibits the possibility for real change: it takes in the collective effort of intersectional feminism and spits out individualistic gender equality and antiracism in its most feeble form.”

Media Diversified

by Maya Goodfellow

Last week while flicking through TV channels an advert caught my attention. I was momentarily pleased to watch as a young girl was enchanted by clips of famous women – from feminist activist Emmeline Pankhurst to iconic singer Billie Holiday – while Fleur East’s version of Girl on Fire played in the background. But as the feature came to a close, I was jolted back into reality; this was an advert, a multimillion-pound advert for Virgin Media, to be precise. The billion pound conglomerate is now using women and girls to sell broadband. Exploiting feminism for profit.

I can’t celebrate seeing feminism exploited in the ad breaks by a company that has been built by taking millions from the taxpayer. Virgin ushers publicly run assets into the private sector then languishes on subsidies from the public purse while making a huge profit. This is not an outlandish…

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LITERATURE: Samuel Delany and the Past and Future of Science Fiction | Neo-Griot

LITERATURE: Samuel Delany and the Past and Future of Science Fiction | Neo-Griot.

From the beginning, Delany, in his fiction, has pushed across the traditional boundaries of science fiction, embraced the other, and questioned received ideas about sex and intimacy.

Samuel Delaney & Other Sci-Fi Authors Talk Feminism and Genre Writing in New HeForShe Video | Dark Matters

Samuel Delaney & Other Sci-Fi Authors Talk Feminism and Genre Writing in New HeForShe Video | Dark Matters.

“Here are Samuel R. Delany, Joe Haldeman, Simon R. Green, Ian R. MacLeod, Ian McDonald and Todd McCaffrey singing the praises of female sci fi greats like Ursula K. Le Guin, Octavia E. Butler, and Andre Norton.”  at http://www.themarysue.com/heforshe-scifi/

‘Crumbs’ – The First Ever Ethiopian Post-Apocalyptic, Sur | From “Shadow and Act

‘Crumbs’ – The First Ever Ethiopian Post-Apocalyptic, Sur | Shadow and Act. “Directed by Spaniard Llansó, who actually

lives in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), “Crumbs” stars Daniel Tadesse, and

tells a story of diminutive superhero Gagano (played by Tadesse), a junk collector, who embarks on a “surreal epic

journey”  that’s set against “post-apocalyptic Ethiopian landscapes,” says the press description.”

By Tambay A. Obenson | Shadow and Act

 

From “The Moral Dilemmas Of Narrative” a timely post on ethics and priniciples when writing about living subjects

The Moral Dilemmas Of Narrative | Gangrey.com.

A timely excerpt from Gangrey.com’s post of Bill Marvel’s book introduction:

“Compassion seems simple enough. It requires we be aware of our subjects’ feelings, that we write in a way that, if possible, minimizes their distress. If the revelations become awkward, we try to balance the good the story does against the harm.

The obligation to be sensitive likewise requires us to be aware of our subject’s needs, for example, for security and privacy. Subjects who don’t know better need to be warned of the consequences publication of a story might bring. We might tell a subject, “If there’s anything that you don’t want your boss or family to know, tell us ahead of time so we can figure out how to handle it.” What we write should never expose children to ridicule, exploitation or danger.

Compassion and sensitivity thus tell us how to approach our subjects from the outside.

Empathy, the word Lee Hancock murmured that morning, is more difficult. Because empathy requires that we approach our subjects from the inside. We try to enter into the emotions, thoughts, the very lives of those we write about. We try to imagine what it must be like to be them. Only by living in their skin at least briefly, by walking in their shoes, can we begin to see that person as he or she is. This requires moral imagination. It is what the good fiction writer does. And it is, I argue, what we writers of nonfiction must do.

There are learned people who will argue that this is impossible, and they may be right. How can we ever fully know another person? But the impossibility does not erase the obligation to try. That obligation demands that our actions as journalists not only be ethically sound, but — taking a word from Janet Malcolm — that they be morally defensible. Ethics is the rules of the game: fairness, honesty and disclosure. Morality is what we owe one another, not as writer and subject, but as fallen human beings. It demands self-knowledge, humility, and charity.

This, I think, sets the bar on its highest peg.”

In gratitude to Stuart Hall, a socialist intellectual who taught us to confront the political with a smile » AFRICA IS A COUNTRY

In gratitude to Stuart Hall, a socialist intellectual who taught us to confront the political with a smile » AFRICA IS A COUNTRY.

Stuart Hall was the most important public intellectual of the past 50 years. In an age where having a TV show allegedly makes someone a public intellectual and where the status of the university you work at counts for more than what you have to say, Hall’s work seems even more urgent and his passing, somehow, even sadder. “