At The Edge – Think Culture 2018 Shows

Greetings readers and listeners! Happy Holidays!

I’ll be adding some poetry to my blog over the brief break. More podcasts are coming for 2019, but for now please download my latest podcast here:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/13/soulful-visions-of-the-speaking-self-ronald-mason

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Here’s my first 2018 episode featuring Ronald Mason:

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/06/22/culture-makers-ronald-mason-and-spoken-word

Also, do check out my talk with Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/05/amanda-huron–carving-out-the-commons

Pick up Amanda’s book here:

https://www.amazon.com/Carving-Out-Commons-Organizing-Cooperatives-ebook/dp/B07B46FS9H/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1544020183&sr=1-1&keywords=amanda+huron

Support my website and podcast here –> cash.me/$drcat

My first book is still available too: https://mellenpress.com/book/How-Three-Black-Women-Writers-Combined-Spiritual-and-Sensual-Love-Rhetorically-Transcending-the-Boundaries-of-Language-Audre-Lorde-Toni-Morrison-and-Dionne-Brand/7973/

I am currently at work on my second book!

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Safe travels, and hugs/kisses for all my readers and listeners!

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A word of wisdom from a literary ancestor I met briefly during grad school

“For the poet, the world is word. Words. Not that precisely. Precisely: the world and words fuck each other.”
― Kathy Acker

It was my first conference, my first time presenting a paper at an academic conference, and my first time in California. San Diego was almost overwhelming to my senses, but upon listening to this heavily tattooed woman with face piercings, electric blue leggings, and short blond hair, I began the process of understanding why I was drawn to Henry Miller, Anais Nin, and Erica Jong–and ultimately Audre Lorde, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison.

I love Kathy Acker, God rest her beautiful, subversive soul and her penchant for being so raw, so fierce, so raunchy, and so unafraid of putting it out there for us to see. It was my first time meeting and listening to a writer who showed me how to embrace my own penchant for not giving a fuck about what people think about me writing about erotic subjectivity or writing about desire.  Imagine that, given the assumptions about religious, racial, and social class similarities and differences regarding women in America.

If you are reading this, go click on my podcast with Ronald Mason–I didn’t mention all of these writers during our podcast talk, but the ghosts of Nin, Miller, and Lorde were in the room and on the phone as we spoke. I think I’ve been holding back, a bit of a wound that has not healed from the trauma of grad school and worsened in the business of academia. Mason and I did talk on that a bit. He gets it as a writer as well as an administrator in academia.

And no, it is not an accident that my confidence as a literary scholar and as a creative writer revived itself when he came to UDC in 2015–sometimes a change in leadership from mundane and normalized misogynoir in academia can liberate the marginalized from the corners, even it wasn’t necessarily intentional. A pause so to speak, so that one’s passion for the word can flourish. He called me a scholar in a previous podcast I posted this summer–something I don’t hear often from colleagues.

To be Black and female in academia (even at a so-called HBCU) is to be constantly challenged as to whether one is truly a scholar, or even someone who is qualified to teach. Unlike the previous leaders at UDC, this man who is our leader actually calls me Dr. Turpin and means it. In this political climate that’s worth mentioning more than once–and bookmarking as a reminder every single time a cloud of worry or anxiety about my worth as a writer emerges.

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Enjoy your holidays!

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Happy Yule!

I’ll be adding some poetry over the brief break, but meanwhile, do download my latest podcast here –> http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/13/soulful-visions-of-the-speaking-self-ronald-mason

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Support my website and podcast here –> cash.me/$drcat

Safe travels, and hugs/kisses for all my readers and listeners!

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Soulful Visions of the Speaking Self – download it right now!

My show last night flowed really well, and the sound quality was much better than I thought. Have a listen while you head to work in the morning! http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/13/soulful-visions-of-the-speaking-self-ronald-mason

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Soulful Visions of the Speaking Self: Ronald Mason on At the Edge – Thinking Culture

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Ronald Mason the spoken word artist who came to Washington DC as an educator from New Orleans returns for part two to talk about poetry, spoken word, and making culture. Poet Carl Moore who hails from Philadelphia will briefly join us to share his work as well. Tonight we will each share our works, methods, and stories about what it means to be creative writers in a highly politicized time period while holding true to our visions as artists. Tonight we will discuss soulful visions and being true to the speaking self! http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/13/soulful-visions-of-the-speaking-self-ronald-mason

Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons – BlogTalk Radio Interview Today

My show will start at 4:30 today with Amanda Huron – Carving Out the Commons http://www.blogtalkradio.com/at-the-edge-thinkculture/2018/12/05/amanda-huron–carving-out-the-commons

Provoked by mass evictions and the onset of gentrification in the 1970s, tenants in Washington, D.C. began forming cooperative organizations to collectively purchase and manage their apartment buildings. These tenants were creating a commons, taking a resource—housing—that had been used to extract profit from them, and reshaping it as a resource that was collectively owned and governed by them. In Carving Out the Commons, Amanda Huron theorizes the practice of urban commoning through a close investigation of the city’s limited-equity housing cooperatives. Drawing on feminist and anticapitalist perspectives, Huron asks whether a commons can work in a city where land and other resources are scarce, and how strangers who may not share a past or future come together to create and maintain commonly-held spaces in the midst of capitalism. Arguing against the romanticization of the commons, she instead positions the urban commons as a pragmatic practice. Through the practice of commoning, she contends, we can learn to build communities to challenge capitalism’s totalizing claims over life.

Author Bio

Amanda Huron is an associate professor of interdisciplinary social sciences at the University of the District of Columbia, in Washington, D.C. She is an urban geographer with a particular interest in housing, gentrification, the decommodification of land, and the history of Washington, D.C. Amanda serves on the board of Empower D.C., a citywide community organizing group that works to empower low- and moderate-income District residents, with a particular focus on anti-displacement work. She is a native of Washington, D.C.’s Ward One.

Buy Dr. Huron’s book at Amazon

ignored crisis #30days #30days2018 by Cherie Ann Turpin

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mid 80s era memory from Atlanta
neighbor died in his apt
lonely grad student from GA Tech
mid June heat and flies did their work
the smell of death walking nearby
dozen eggs long expired exploding
as breath of life liquified and melted
like gaslight unlit in a room with locked windows
no one noticed his silence or absence
until the smell reached beyond his walls
the slow creep of rot ignored by us all

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