LITERATURE: Samuel Delany and the Past and Future of Science Fiction | Neo-Griot

LITERATURE: Samuel Delany and the Past and Future of Science Fiction | Neo-Griot.

From the beginning, Delany, in his fiction, has pushed across the traditional boundaries of science fiction, embraced the other, and questioned received ideas about sex and intimacy.

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Afro-futurism Scholar 2014 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for my blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 3,600 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 60 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

From “The Moral Dilemmas Of Narrative” a timely post on ethics and priniciples when writing about living subjects

The Moral Dilemmas Of Narrative | Gangrey.com.

A timely excerpt from Gangrey.com’s post of Bill Marvel’s book introduction:

“Compassion seems simple enough. It requires we be aware of our subjects’ feelings, that we write in a way that, if possible, minimizes their distress. If the revelations become awkward, we try to balance the good the story does against the harm.

The obligation to be sensitive likewise requires us to be aware of our subject’s needs, for example, for security and privacy. Subjects who don’t know better need to be warned of the consequences publication of a story might bring. We might tell a subject, “If there’s anything that you don’t want your boss or family to know, tell us ahead of time so we can figure out how to handle it.” What we write should never expose children to ridicule, exploitation or danger.

Compassion and sensitivity thus tell us how to approach our subjects from the outside.

Empathy, the word Lee Hancock murmured that morning, is more difficult. Because empathy requires that we approach our subjects from the inside. We try to enter into the emotions, thoughts, the very lives of those we write about. We try to imagine what it must be like to be them. Only by living in their skin at least briefly, by walking in their shoes, can we begin to see that person as he or she is. This requires moral imagination. It is what the good fiction writer does. And it is, I argue, what we writers of nonfiction must do.

There are learned people who will argue that this is impossible, and they may be right. How can we ever fully know another person? But the impossibility does not erase the obligation to try. That obligation demands that our actions as journalists not only be ethically sound, but — taking a word from Janet Malcolm — that they be morally defensible. Ethics is the rules of the game: fairness, honesty and disclosure. Morality is what we owe one another, not as writer and subject, but as fallen human beings. It demands self-knowledge, humility, and charity.

This, I think, sets the bar on its highest peg.”

Breadcrumb: “5 Brilliant Books on Black Women and Sexuality :: Books :: Lists :: Paste”

5 Brilliant Books on Black Women and Sexuality :: Books :: Lists :: Paste.

I’ll admit it:  I’m not familiar with one of these books: Recyclopedia: Trimmings, S-PeRM—K-T, and Muse & Drudge by Harryette Mullen. I have quite a collection of “brilliant books” written by Black women, and while most of them do not center just on sexualities, all of them touch on issues of the body and the sensual in one way or another.  So much of what has been and continues to be our experience in the West deals with the recovery of ourselves from so much pain, so much damage to our souls.

I’m ordering Recyclopediarose right after I finish posting this breadcrumb.  Guess I need to do my own list now, but do click and read the list.  Feel free to share your own list here!

 

IAW&A Salon in DC, “Cultural Bridges”: An Evening of Artistic, Cultural, & Personal Connections, 4/4/14 | Irish American Writers & Artists

” Friday, April 4, 2014, Irish American Writers and Artists (IAW&A) held its  first “road Salon” in  Washington, DC at the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) and the evening turned out to be one of true artistic, cultural, and personal connection.   Because UDC is considered a “historically black college,” the event was billed, “Cultural Bridges: DC Salon.”  The Salon was organized by Dr. Cherie Ann Turpin of the English department at UDC and myself, the Salon Producer for the IAW&A.  Travel and hotel expenses for the New York artists were generously provided for the New York artists by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Ireland.”

Read more here–> IAW&A Salon in DC, “Cultural Bridges”: An Evening of Artistic, Cultural, & Personal Connections, 4/4/14 | Irish American Writers & Artists.

Join the UDC Department of English, World Languages, and Cultures and Irish American Writers and Artists, Inc for our DC Salon on April 4, 6:30-9:00 PM, UDC, Building 41, Room A03!

Join the UDC Department of English, World Languages, and Cultures and Irish American Writers and Artists, Inc for our DC Salon on April 4, 6:30-9:00 PM, University of the District of Columbia, Building 41, Room A03!

iawa_dc_salon

In gratitude to Stuart Hall, a socialist intellectual who taught us to confront the political with a smile » AFRICA IS A COUNTRY

In gratitude to Stuart Hall, a socialist intellectual who taught us to confront the political with a smile » AFRICA IS A COUNTRY.

Stuart Hall was the most important public intellectual of the past 50 years. In an age where having a TV show allegedly makes someone a public intellectual and where the status of the university you work at counts for more than what you have to say, Hall’s work seems even more urgent and his passing, somehow, even sadder. “